Sabbath examination

As I was preparing for this coming Sunday’s sermon, I came across a quote which has stuck with me the rest of the week.  The author, Norman Wirzba, in talking about the practice of Sabbath, stated, “…It is in our mundane, daily living that we show most honestly what we think life is finally for.”  As I pondered this quote, it made think about how I use my time, and in particular, those moments which often go unnoticed or unobserved.  The quote wasn’t simply an examination of one’s time, but a call to examination of those daily moments which pass by so quickly, we rarely bat an eye at them.  In other words, what do we do with those ordinary moments in which we aren’t focused on the business of the day or the major tasks ahead? How do we occupy those moments? Do we occupy them with more business?  Do we occupy them with fretting over the next paycheck? Do we occupy them with daydreams of a different future? Do we occupy them in front of the mirror or on our phone?

As the author stated, these moments are most revealing as to what we believe is at the heart of life.  If we examined them, we might discover our appearance is what life is finally all about.  Or, we might discover our family connection is what our life is all about.  We might discover we fill this time with countless hours on social media.  Whatever we discover about how we spend those daily moments, it reveals to us what matters to us in life.  It shows us what we take delight in and what we hunger for in life.  These moments can be revelatory because when all of life’s busyness is stripped away, we are left with the freedom to choose what happens next.  So what do those ordinary moments reveal to you about your life? I encourage you this week to be conscious of your daily tasks and what they reveal.  As I have discovered since reading this quote, I need transformation because what I do and what I believe have not always matched up.  I need God to intervene to help me live my daily moments toward the Kingdom of God.

Blessings,
Pastor Nathan